Understanding London’s knife crime epidemic

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Healing Relations PR & City Gates Conference Centre

(Press Release) “Tackling The Issue of Knife Crime Through the Community”

NEWS UPDATE:

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Police arrest 586 people in county lines crackdown 

519 vulnerable adults and 364 children in need of support were helped 500 men and 86 women were arrested in raids in Norfolk, Suffolk, Cheshire, Bedfordshire and other areas.

County line drugs gangs – is linked by a network of mobile phone lines and often coercing children and vulnerable adults – travel out of their usual urban territory and into rural areas to sell drugs. Most come out of London, Birmingham and Merseyside, said NCA County Lines lead Nikki Holland. Tackling the gangs is a “national law enforcement priority”. Children as young as 12 are being put in danger by criminals who are taking advantage of how vulnerable these young people are.

Exclusive: Tackling knife crime with the Met Police https://news.sky.com/video/exclusive-tackling-knife-crime-with-the-met-police-10884781

HRH Prince Harry backs Youth Zones to tackle knife crime crisis:
https://news.sky.com/story/how-police-could-predict-fatal-knife-attacks-11694472

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Teenagers accounted for more than 1,000 admissions to hospital as a result of assaults with a knife or sharp object last year 2018, NHS figures show. Admissions for all injuries caused by an assault with knife or other sharp objects have gone up by almost a third since 2012-13, from 3,849 to 4,986 last year.

Doctors warned that high street sales of knives is helping to fuel the rise in stabbings, and called on retailers to do more to stem the tide of available weapons. Admissions involving youngsters aged between 10 and 19 increased nearly twice as fast, with 656 hospital admissions in 2012-13 up to 1,012 last year – a rise of around 55%. (England.nhs.uk 2019)

EXCLUSIVE INFORMATION

**The presentation below contains strong and explicit language**

INTERVIEW:David Lammy MP “Kids are getting killed where is the Prime Minister and where is the London Mayor Sadiq Khan?”

BoxUpCrime | Help Stop Knife Crime and Rebuild Misguided Dreams! (Stephen Addison)

The 1970s was a good era: Even though we lived it behind school walls

By Jennifer Valentine-Miller

My classmates will not be remembered for being celebrities or for surviving the 1970s. The class of 1978 made a name for themselves because they loved television, music, and sports as well as their school.  School-life was filled with fun and laughter. There was always a scandal around the corner.  I stand tall and commend the good times in my life. I will never forget how we overcame barriers, stigmas and years of pain and hard labour. We step forward in order to be celebrated and step out to celebrate all we have done.


1976 – present

Keeping Teens on Your Side

by Jennifer Valentine-Miller

I spent a good and constructive day with the City Women team. They were tackling a national concern entitled “Keeping Teens on Your Side.” The day was spent listening to the personal stories of parents and teenage guests, and valid information from a senior youth leader from City Gates Church  who spoke about the best way to keep relationships with teens is to keep it real, as well as:

1. Get to know their friends
2. When you are going through something it can really effect young people.
3. Teens biggest struggles is Relationships.
4. Be friends, yes, and set boundaries.
5. Balance form views with true understanding.
6. Monitor internet use and phone calls, eating disorders, alcohol consumption, and signs of self-harming.

Child Development

Why must I go to the country?

by Journalist & TV Presenter Peaches Geldof

Last Easter weekend, record-breaking numbers of us flocked to the countryside. We went seeking “fresh air and peace”, according to the English Tourist Board; a chance to “de-stress from our working lives”.
I’m sorry, but I don’t understand this. At the prospect of spending time in the country, I shudder. This feeling hasn’t grown on me gradually – I’ve always hated it. Not only is it boring but, I also genuinely believe that it slowly drives people insane.
All over Britain, teenagers in families thought lucky enough to have a rural second home are dragged off to spend “quality time” with their nearest and dearest – which means sitting for hours on end playing Scrabble, or if you’re really lucky, going to the pub for the much-anticipated Bingo night with the locals.
I’m always being asked: “Why don’t you make any friends there?” The answer is because most of the people seem to be pensioners, who want to talk about the weather or hunting. The small section of children my age are wannabe rude boys whose only topic of conversation centres on: “Innit, man. Check out dat new Gilera 180 moped with golden alloys . . . it’s da bomb, bo Selecta.” This was amusing for some time. Then it got boring – like everything else in the country.
I can see the good aspects of rural life – if you’re getting on a bit and considering retirement. Peace and quiet, friendly locals, much-needed rest and relaxation to soothe your old bones. But for us young people, it’s hell. I love London because it’s noisy, crammed with humanity and there’s always something happening. I hate the country because the only noise there is the constant hooting of wood pigeons, and the only people there are dressed in tweed jackets and want to shoot them.
Sure, the country is beautiful, there’s no denying that. But so is the city. Look at the architecture, it’s incredible. Big Ben and Buckingham Palace are surely more stimulating than a couple of trees and some ducks in a pond.
I know this might sound awful, but I was almost relieved when the foot-and-mouth crisis started. For me, and for lots of my friends, it meant more time in London doing something exciting or productive, like meeting up with friends to go shopping or out clubbing. But now the countryside is crawling with visitors taking a healthy break, inexplicably enjoying doing, absolutely nothing.
There’s something so forced about the way people talk up the countryside; all that raving about the fresh air. I always feel really drained when I leave.
Here’s a typical, “de-stressing” day: enforced trudge for two miles to a pub for lunch. Arrive with clothes covered in mud. Eat awful fish and chips off pub menu (why do all country pubs serve fish and chips?) Alternatively, hang around while adults spend three hours cooking lunch, then two hours eating it. I hate those long lunches. Afternoon, play Scrabble for two hours. Sit in the kitchen staring at the clock for another hour and-a-half. Watch Bargain Hunt on the 60-year-old television. An hour later, it’s time to feed the ducks in the stinking bog. Look at the sheep – which are there for no reason. Sit in my room watching old Disney videos until it’s time for bed. At eight, mind you.
Another question we’re asked by well-meaning parents is: “Why don’t you bring a friend?” Because no one – no one – wants to come. I remember one terrible weekend when three of my girlfriends couldn’t even bear to stay the night and left four hours later. It really is that boring.
I asked one of them why she left so early. She said that she felt like she was going mad. Understandable, as all we did was read magazines. They left when I suggested the duck pond.
countryside
Peaches Geldof wrote several witty
and thoughtful teen columns for the Telegraph