Prostitution and Unison

Law editor, Luke Gittos wrote:Supporting projects with campaigns “In England, the law which currently governs prostitution, resting on the idea that all prostitutes are vulnerable ‘sex workers’ in need of the state’s protection, is entirely harmful, and dangerously misrepresents a complex reality.”

Prostitution itself is not illegal. However, the Sexual Offences Act of 2003 introduced an offence of ‘controlling’ prostitution. What does ‘controlling’ mean? According to the Court of Appeal it does not require the exercise of force or compulsion. In fact, a woman can be ‘controlled’ in prostitution even if she is ‘exercising free will’ when she chooses to prostitute themselves.

In short, the offence punishes anyone who exerts any degree of ‘control’ whatsoever over a prostitute, even if that prostitute is choosing with absolute freedom to prostitute themselves. How is it that English law has moved to punish those who exercise even nominal ‘control’ over a person’s activities, without punishing the activity itself?

Sweden criminalised buying sex but decriminalised selling it in year 2000. Supporters of the scheme say it has slashed the number of brothels and clients and cut the level of sex trafficking into the country to hundreds of women. Conference believes that it is time for the UK Government to adopt a similar policy, and recognise that for this to be effective there also needs to be increased investment in drug rehabilitation programmes, education programmes, and other support programmes to provide women with viable alternatives and a route out of the trade.

According to the government, 85% of women in brothels now come from outside the UK, however, while men have been convicted for trafficking women into Britain, none has so far been prosecuted for paying for sex with women or girls forced into the sex trade.

The public sector’s union, Unison, wrote that prostitution is a serious social ill, which affects hundreds of thousands of women and children. It is time for men to get the message that women are not for sale. That it is only by criminalising clients that women working in brothels as well as on the streets can be helped, and that this criminalization will send out a clear signal that paying for sex is not acceptable.

Public Relations (non-for-profit)

“Public Relations is about reputation – the result of what you do, what you say and what others say about you.”

 

 

Welcome to my media and Public Relations initiative, which was birthed as Healing Relations TV in 2007 focusing on generating advertisements, Church awareness, and customer care.

I write and produce blogs so that people working in the field of media and members of the press – are able to track useful information that relates to current news items.  I hope that these papers are fulfilling & relevant within the boundaries of truth. I believe it is good for us all to understand how “real people” live.

The media and press are busy people who will naturally gravitate towards websites that make it easy for them to get the information they need. My intentions as Public Relations, is to focus on church awareness, social issues, leisure activities & advertisements. I enjoy relating to current affairs, relaxing,  and reflecting on the past. I  achieved my Journalist status with training and guidance from Planet Ivy Media and my presentation skills boost my position as Social Media manager.

Jennifer Valentine-Miller
Director & owner of Healing Relations PR & Healing Relations TV 
 (BA Hons Leadership & Management, ACIPR)

Is Britain a Christian Country? And what does that even mean?

By Heather Tomlinson
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A new poll has found that less than a third of visionaries believe that the UK is a ‘Christian country’. The latest data on whether the public considers the UK to be a ‘Christian nation’ doesn’t hold too many surprises. But I hope it can help us to think more deeply about what it really means to be a Christian.
The data, from a ComRes survey by the Faith Research Centre, showed that just 31% of young adults aged 18-24 considered Britain to be a Christian country, compared to 74% of those of pensionable age: 41% of the young adults thought Britain had no religious identity.
Whether or not you consider the UK to have a Christian identity depends somewhat on whether you consider the terms ‘Christian’ and ‘British’ to be a compliments or not. A militant atheist who considers the term Christian the same as ‘narrow-minded bigot’ is not likely to identify with it. So it’s not surprising to see that as atheism has become more popular in the younger generation, so has describing Britain as ‘Christian’.

(Full article via Premier Christianity Magazine)