Understanding London’s knife crime epidemic

Teenagers accounted for more than 1,000 admissions to hospital as a result of assaults with a knife or sharp object last year 2018, NHS figures show. Admissions for all injuries caused by an assault with knife or other sharp objects have gone up by almost a third since 2012-13, from 3,849 to 4,986 last year.

Doctors warned that high street sales of knives is helping to fuel the rise in stabbings, and called on retailers to do more to stem the tide of available weapons. Admissions involving youngsters aged between 10 and 19 increased nearly twice as fast, with 656 hospital admissions in 2012-13 up to 1,012 last year – a rise of around 55%. (england.nhs.uk 2019)

How police could ‘predict’ fatal knife attacks
Police could target areas of London which data has predicted as future hotspots of fatal stabbings, a study suggests. A Scotland Yard detective manually plotted the locations of 3,506 non-fatal stabbings in 2016-2017 and compared them to the locations of the 97 London homicides in 2017-18. Research, published in the Cambridge Journal of Evidence-Based Policing, suggested the amount of knife-related injuries over one year correlates with an increased risk of fatal knife attacks the next year.
Options for police could include increased stop-and-search measures in the hotspot areas.

HRH Prince Harry backs Youth Zones to tackle knife crime crisis: https://news.sky.com/story/how-police-could-predict-fatal-knife-attacks-11694472

BoxUpCrime | Help Stop Knife Crime and Rebuild Misguided Dreams! (Stephen Addison)

**The presentation below contains strong and explicit swear words**

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Early-bird rates ends
30 April 2019

Violent crime is on the rise, but who is working to keep us safe?

Policeforce

England and Wales have lost over 45,000 police officers and staff since 2010, a 19% drop in the workforce. Meanwhile, violent crime is on the rise and forces are struggling to respond to demand due to budget cuts, recent reports from the Office for National Statistics and police watchdog HMIC have found.

But what does that mean for your community?
UNISON is the biggest union for police staff. They have investigated the drop within each of the 43 police forces in England and Wales.

The police workforce is made up of policing officers and police staff who work in teams to keep communities safe. Police staff make up 40% of the total police workforce and carry out both operational and supporting roles.  Police staff include police community support officers (PCSOs), and designated officers (like crime scene examiners, investigators, escort and custody officers) who have police powers.

All these categories of police staff, as well as police officers, have suffered big cuts in numbers since 2010.

Go Smoke Free (campaign)

“Smokers don’t need self-righteous campaigners regulating their behaviour. You’ll always get a few inconsiderate smokers but that’s no reason to punish the overwhelming majority. We’re in danger of creating an incredibly censorious society in which regulations are based not on potential harm to others but on people’s personal preferences.” Smokers’Forest Group

Prostitution and Unison

(Editor: Jennifer Valentine-Miller)

Law editor, Luke Gittos wrote:Supporting projects with campaigns “In England, the law which currently governs prostitution, resting on the idea that all prostitutes are vulnerable ‘sex workers’ in need of the state’s protection, is entirely harmful, and dangerously misrepresents a complex reality.”

Prostitution itself is not illegal. However, the Sexual Offences Act of 2003 introduced an offence of ‘controlling’ prostitution. In fact, a woman can be ‘controlled’ in prostitution even if she is ‘exercising free will’ when she chooses to prostitute herself.

In short, the offence punishes anyone who exerts any degree of ‘control’ whatsoever over a prostitute, even if that prostitute is choosing with absolute freedom to prostitute themselves. How is it that English law has moved to punish those who exercise even nominal ‘control’ over a person’s activities, without punishing the activity itself?

Sweden criminalised buying sex but decriminalised selling it in year 2000, reducing many brothels and cutting the level of sex trafficking into the country. The public sector’s conference believes that it is time for the UK Government to adopt a similar policy, and recognise that for this to be effective there also needs to be increased investment in drug rehabilitation programmes, education programmes, and other support programmes to provide women with viable alternatives and a route out of the trade.

According to the UK government, 85% of women in brothels now come from outside the UK, however, while men have been convicted for trafficking women into Britain, none has so far been prosecuted for paying for sex with women or girls forced into the sex trade.

The public sector’s union, Unison, wrote that prostitution is a serious social ill, which affects hundreds of thousands of women and children. It is time for men to get the message that women are not for sale, and by criminalising this it will then send out a clear mesage stating that paying for sex is not acceptable.