NHS Bosses tell managers to accept “white fragility” over race

(Daily Mail on Sunday 19 September 2021)

No More Tick Boxes informs readers that non-white NHS staff are routinely discriminated against because of Britain’s ‘history as an Imperial power’.

It advises NHS mentors to check their behaviour so that they are not guilty of ‘micro-aggressions’.

And NHS East of England recommends managers read another guide that tells white public sector administrators they only got their jobs ‘because of the colour of your skin’.

NHS chiefs declined to say how much No More Tick Boxes cost, and stood by both guides’ inclusion on a reading list for managers.

‘White fragility is the flip side of a sense of entitlement developed over many years.’

The idea – coined by a white American woman, former education professor Robin DiAngelo – is controversial. Fellow academics argue that it is a racist stereotype that lumps white people together as ‘oppressors’ who suffer the same psychological flaw, as well as being used to shut down debate.

The guide states that black and minority ethnic (BME) NHS staff suffer because of Britain’s colonial past: ‘Whilst the proportion of White people who are overtly racist is a minority, assumptions about inferiority which undermine the employment and well-being of BME staff are widespread and deeply ingrained through our history as an Imperial power.’

Public Relations standing in the midst during Black History Month

by Jennifer Valentine-Miller

The Heritage Fund has seen, in 2020, an increased focus and discussion on issues that particularly affect black people and communities across the UK. From the emotive and significant Black Lives Matter movement, to the disproportionately adverse effects of coronavirus (COVID-19). Corporate Management are discussing these issues and are trying to find solutions or seek advice, because the impact on the mental health and well-being of black leaders and their colleagues can sometimes be overlooked.

My story: During the pandemic I worked for a backroom NHS organisation commissioning services for staff and patients in England. I work from home on an administrative/front-of house basis (through-out the day I receive most the of calls, give out information, log the calls on a spreadsheet for analysing purposes).

It was in 2014 when I obtained a BA Hons degree studying various leadership and management styles within not-for-profit organisations. During that time I started badgering the communications “comms” team about opportunities to “move up” from my current position. I did not want to pay for another degree i.e. Masters degree, so I approached the communications manager again and it was then she introduced me to the Chartered Institute for Public Relations (CIPR) in order for me to gain professional recognition as well hear from professionals whose specialism is within all aspects of society. However, it was a Financial Director at work who realised I was a disgruntled BAME employee and advised me to further my online platform called Healing Relations PR and consider becoming its “Director”; allowing me to move away from a ministry to a business working alongside other businesses.

Some of the projects and campaigns I have worked alongside are:
*S.A.Y. (serious about youth) the Conference – (campaigning for longer jail term sentences for groomers and for those who fatally wound a young person).

*The NHS England Stop Smoking Awareness campaign.

*Issues in sport including racism and bullying (working alongside Sports Chaplaincy UK)

*Supporting my neighbourhood against anti-social behaviour

Success, Love, & All – The Theatrical audio 🎁

Audio production (11 mins 30 secs)
by
Ravenpheat Productions

Success, Love and All written by Jennifer Valentine-Miller is listed under the short play category. The play has a sports theme with an inspirational message. The voice actors performing are Alexandria Stevens, Shane Stevens, Norma-Jean Strickland and Eric Bond.

Awesound have helped release the production onto its platform and it is now available for audio play and download ($5.50). 🎁 The discount code DEUCE40 allows for a 10% discount. This offer also applies outside of the US territory.

BAME staff on the road to inclusion

Edited by Jennifer Valentine-Miller

“The NHS depends on black and minority ethnic staff to provide high quality, reliable and safe care to patients.” (The Guardian, 2018)

The creation of the NHS 70 years ago coincided with the beginning of a wave of immigration from the Commonwealth and colonies. The British Nationality Act of 1948 affirmed unrestricted movement within the Commonwealth. In 1962 Enoch Powell, the then Conservative health minister launched the Hospital Plan – which envisaged the NHS expanding due to a short supply of skilled staff. Because of their value to the Service their contribution was recognised.

Unfortunately, today many BME staff are experiencing a different NHS which is not as successful or rewarding compared to non-BME staff.

The NHS Leadership Academy state that they hold the principles of equality and inclusion at the heart of everything they do and all that they stand for – the NHS is a universal service and are committed to developing a leadership community which is representative of the groups they serve.