Everyone’s talking about COP26 – including the NHS

NHSPS creating a healthier estate

The UK Government has an ambitious net zero carbon target set for 2050 and the NHS is striving for net zero carbon by 2040. According to reports, the NHS accounts for 3.5% of all road travel in the UK. They are committed to the NHS England’s “Greener NHS campaign” which brings NHS partners together to share ideas on how to reduce the impact on public health and the environment. The challenge for the NHS is in not only meeting these targets but that in doing so, being aware of the changes that need to be made to their buildings including hospitals, health centres, GP practices, and withstanding the risks posed by climate change while exploiting the benefits it presents (NHS Property Services report 21/22). To do this, the right systems must be in place, through the implementation of an effective Environmental Management System (EMS), is key. The NHS will continue in their pursuit for environmental protection and will also be focusing on the mitigation and adaptation of our buildings and operations against the effects of climate change.

The UK Government has an ambitious net zero carbon target set for 2050 and the NHS is striving for net zero carbon by 2040. According to reports, the NHS accounts for 3.5% of all road travel in the UK. They are committed to the NHS England’s “Greener NHS campaign” which brings NHS partners together to share ideas on how to reduce the impact on public health and the environment. The challenge for the NHS is in not only meeting these targets but that in doing so, being aware of the changes that need to be made to their buildings including hospitals, health centres, GP practices, and withstanding the risks posed by climate change while exploiting the benefits it presents (NHS Property Services report 21/22). To do this, the right systems must be in place, through the implementation of an effective Environmental Management System (EMS), is key. The NHS will continue in their pursuit for environmental protection and will also be focusing on the mitigation and adaptation of all health buildings and its operations against the effects of climate change.

NHS Bosses tell managers to accept “white fragility” over race

(Daily Mail on Sunday 19 September 2021)

No More Tick Boxes informs readers that non-white NHS staff are routinely discriminated against because of Britain’s ‘history as an Imperial power’.

It advises NHS mentors to check their behaviour so that they are not guilty of ‘micro-aggressions’.

And NHS East of England recommends managers read another guide that tells white public sector administrators they only got their jobs ‘because of the colour of your skin’.

NHS chiefs declined to say how much No More Tick Boxes cost, and stood by both guides’ inclusion on a reading list for managers.

‘White fragility is the flip side of a sense of entitlement developed over many years.’

The idea – coined by a white American woman, former education professor Robin DiAngelo – is controversial. Fellow academics argue that it is a racist stereotype that lumps white people together as ‘oppressors’ who suffer the same psychological flaw, as well as being used to shut down debate.

The guide states that black and minority ethnic (BME) NHS staff suffer because of Britain’s colonial past: ‘Whilst the proportion of White people who are overtly racist is a minority, assumptions about inferiority which undermine the employment and well-being of BME staff are widespread and deeply ingrained through our history as an Imperial power.’

BBC Olympics presenter Alex Scott “accepts” criticism of her accent

Former Arsenal Women’s football legend and now BBC presenter Alex Scott has received criticism from an ex-minister of her pronunciations whilst hosting the Tokyo Olympic. Alex Scott responded by underlining her pride in her roots and rebuked complaints based on her lack of elocution lessons.

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A prayer for athletes experiencing poor mental health & suffering with an injury

by Jennifer Valentine-Miller

Dear heavenly Father, what a wonderful name is the name of Jesus and it is in His name that I pray for healing for this athlete today. You designed their body from the top of the head down to the tips of their toes. I pray for encouragement to help them get through – however long it takes to deal with this injury. Please send encouragement from the physiotherapists and mental health practitioners, and send, through this prayer, a miracle of your healing touch either by the medical care offered or supernaturally. Thank you for your wonderful working power and loving compassion you give to this athlete today. Amen.

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Standard Sport@standardsport· Women’s top seed Ashleigh Barty retires from French Open due to injury#RolandGarros

Before travelling to Italy #AndyMurray described the series of injury setbacks he has suffered since his hip resurfacing surgery in 2019 as “hard to take”. It is not clear what is behind the latest setback.

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Naomi Osaka Withdraws From French Open 2021 For Opponents’ Mental Health #RolandGarros

The Independent @Independent Trent Alexander-Arnold’s injury a new problem for England’s wounded squad #Euro2020

A prayer during Social Injustice due to Racism

By Jennifer Valentine-Miller

Heavenly Father, I pray in the name Jesus Christ who reached out to the woman at the well from the outcast village of Samaria. You, Jesus, saw no barriers and gave light to the blind and freedom to those in prison. Help us to break down the barriers in our community. Help us to see the reality of racism and ignorance, and free us to challenge and uproot it from ourselves, our society, and our world.

Jennifer Valentine-Miller @ Sports Chaplaincy

Living With Loss During The Pandemic

(Contributions included from Churches United)

The COVID-19 pandemic has left many people around the world unable to be with a loved one when they die, or unable to mourn someone’s death in-person with friends and family. There are other types of loss including unemployment, not making enough money, loss or reduction in support services, and other changes in your lifestyle. These losses can happen at the same time, which only complicates or prolong grief. This prolonging delays a person’s ability to adapt, heal, and recover.

What To Do Immediately After a Knife Attack

#SeriousAboutYouth via BBC Bitesize

In the unlikely event that you are ever a victim of, or a witness to, a knife attack there are some practical steps you can take to make sure that you and those around you stay as safe as possible. While it would be perfectly natural to panic when someone has just been harmed, time is important. Street Doctors have this vital advice to follow immediately if you ever experience or witness a stabbing:

1. Keep yourself safe
By safe, means out of harm’s way. If there is an active argument or crime scene and it’s not safe to stay with someone who’s been hurt, get to a place of safety such as a shop, cafe, restaurant, gym, youth centre or police, ambulance or fire station. Go to where there are adults or members of the public. When you’re safe, call for help by dialing 999. Ask for an ambulance.

  1. Apply pressure to the wound
    First check there is no sharp object in the wound. If there is no sharp object present you can apply pressure directly to the wound. If you have something to wrap around your own hands, such as clothing or a scarf, etc. you can use that.
    If a sharp object is present DO NOT remove it. If you can do so without hurting yourself, you can apply pressure by placing your hands to the sides of the object on the person’s body, and pushing down. Keep your hands a safe distance from the sharp object.
    Applying pressure might cause discomfort, but the more pressure you apply, the greater your chance of helping a blood clot to form and preventing further loss of blood.

3.Keep calm
We know that this would be a really stressful situation but if you can, be as calm as possible and stay on the phone with the ambulance staff. They can offer you real-time help.

4.Emergency first aid
If the person is not breathing, perform chest compressions by placing your hands on top of each other and pushing down in the centre of their chest (aim for 30 compressions at a rate of 100 compressions per minute). If you’re unsure what to do inform the ambulance staff on the phone will help you.

Public Relations standing in the midst during Black History Month

by Jennifer Valentine-Miller

The Heritage Fund has seen, in 2020, an increased focus and discussion on issues that particularly affect black people and communities across the UK. From the emotive and significant Black Lives Matter movement, to the disproportionately adverse effects of coronavirus (COVID-19). Corporate Management are discussing these issues and are trying to find solutions or seek advice, because the impact on the mental health and well-being of black leaders and their colleagues can sometimes be overlooked.

My story: During the pandemic I worked for a backroom NHS organisation commissioning services for staff and patients in England. I work from home on an administrative/front-of house basis (through-out the day I receive most the of calls, give out information, log the calls on a spreadsheet for analysing purposes).

It was in 2014 when I obtained a BA Hons degree studying various leadership and management styles within not-for-profit organisations. During that time I started badgering the communications “comms” team about opportunities to “move up” from my current position. I did not want to pay for another degree i.e. Masters degree, so I approached the communications manager again and it was then she introduced me to the Chartered Institute for Public Relations (CIPR) in order for me to gain professional recognition as well hear from professionals whose specialism is within all aspects of society. However, it was a Financial Director at work who realised I was a disgruntled BAME employee and advised me to further my online platform called Healing Relations PR and consider becoming its “Director”; allowing me to move away from a ministry to a business working alongside other businesses.

Some of the projects and campaigns I have worked alongside are:
*S.A.Y. (serious about youth) the Conference – (campaigning for longer jail term sentences for groomers and for those who fatally wound a young person).

*The NHS England Stop Smoking Awareness campaign.

*Issues in sport including racism and bullying (working alongside Sports Chaplaincy UK)

*Supporting my neighbourhood against anti-social behaviour